#utpol

Utah House Democrat Speaks Against Proposed Abortion Bill

Media Statement
 

For Immediate Release:
January 16, 2019 

Contact:         
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(385) 228-5483 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov
 

Utah House Democrat Speaks Against Proposed Abortion Bill

SALT LAKE CITY – Today Rep. Angela Romero (D-District 26) spoke out against a proposed bill by Rep. Cheryl Acton (R-District 43) that would restrict a woman’s right to have an abortion in Utah from 20 weeks of pregnancy down to 15 weeks.

“This is a Federal issue, and the state should leave it alone,” said Rep. Romero.  “Bills like this that have been tried by other states are always struck down.  It’s a waste of time. It’ll never stand up in court.”

Last year a judge struck down a similar 15-week abortion bill passed by Mississippi, which also negated a similar law passed by Louisiana.  In 2014 federal judges struck down attempts for six- and 12-week bans in North Dakota and Arkansas and ruled them unconstitutional.

“This shouldn’t happen.  This is part of a nationwide, calculated effort to impede women from having a choice for an abortion,” Romero added. “Utah has already done enough to hinder women who seek their constitutionally-protected right to govern their body.  We shouldn’t be pushing women further into the shadows. A much better issue for the legislature to focus on should be comprehensive sex education and improving access to healthcare programs.”   

Nationally, abortions have dropped to their lowest rate in a decade, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  In 2015, the most recent year that data is available, the rate was about 11.8 abortions per 1,000 women aged 14 to 44. The number of women in Utah who seek an abortion each year is well below the national average, at 4.6 abortions per 1,000 women in 2014, according to Guttmacher Institute.  

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Rep. Sandra Hollins Opens Bill File to Remove Exception from Utah’s Constitution that Allows for Slavery

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release:
January 4, 2018 

Contact:         
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(385) 228-5483 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov 

Rep. Sandra Hollins Opens Bill File to Remove Exception from Utah’s Constitution that Allows for Slavery

SALT LAKE CITY – Generally, Americans believe slavery in the U.S. was completely abolished more than 150 years ago. The 13th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, ratified in 1865 following the Civil War, abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, but with an exception for punishment for a crime.  Also, the language in Utah’s 1896 constitution, similar to many other states, still seems to permit slavery as a form of punishment for a crime.

Article I, Section 21: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within this State." 

Rep. Sandra Hollins (D-District 23), says it is finally time to change this outdated and troubling language.  She has opened a bill file that, if passed by more than 2/3 of the Legislature’s House and Senate, would let Utahns vote to remove the exception the law currently gives for punishment for crime. 

“Regardless of how we feel about the criminal justice system, it should be clear that it shouldn’t be slavery,” said Rep. Hollins. “Our constitution serves as a basis for all of our laws and policies. We need to be clearer about what prison is for, and what prison is not.  The notion of ‘slavery or involuntary servitude’ should not be imposed on people merely because they are convicted of a crime.  By passing this measure we will assert that slavery is not a Utah value.”

This year Colorado voters approved a similar ballot initiative to amend their state’s constitution to remove the language “except as punishment for a crime” from the section that bans slavery or involuntary servitude.  Colorado’s newly adopted language reads: "There shall never be in this state either slavery or involuntary servitude."

Half the U.S. states do not mention slavery or involuntary servitude at all in their constitutions.  Twenty-five states have language explicitly forbidding slavery or involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. 

Rep. Hollins’ bill is still in the process of being drafted.


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Utah Hispanic Legislators Condemn Trump Administration’s Hostile Anti-Immigrant Agenda, Mortensen Nomination

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: May 25, 2018

Contact:         
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

Jon Hennington
Utah State Senate
801-214-4611 | jhennington@le.utah.gov

Utah Hispanic Legislators Condemn Trump Administration’s
Hostile Anti-Immigrant Agenda, Mortensen Nomination

SALT LAKE CITY – Today Hispanic Democratic Legislators spoke out against President Trump’s worsening anti-immigrant agenda, including the nomination of Ronald Mortensen of Utah, for Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration.

Representative Angela Romero, District 26, said, “This is another push for Trump’s extreme anti-immigration agenda. Ronald Mortensen is certainly not the best person for this position, which is supposed to make sure the United States works to protect and ease the suffering of persecuted and uprooted people around the world. Mortensen is clearly not equipped to manage this responsibility in a fair or compassionate manner.”  

“This nomination reflects poorly on Utah values,” said Representative Rebecca Chavez-Houck, District 24. “Mr. Mortensen has a long history of generally vilifying undocumented immigrants and refugees through his public actions. What the overwhelming majority of Utahns want is compassion, sensitivity, and fair-minded policies towards refugees and immigrants. Utahns have regularly demonstrated this through our welcoming support for immigrants, and through policies such as the Utah Compact.”  

Representative Mark Wheatley, District 35, said, “Ronald Mortensen has regularly made dishonest and hurtful claims about immigrants – such as claiming that most undocumented immigrants commit felonies – when the facts and evidence indicate exactly the opposite. Most undocumented immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens. He even makes ridiculous claims that Utah is a “magnet and sanctuary state” for illegal immigrants. I hope that Senator Hatch and Senator Lee make the most rational decision in this case and oppose this nominee.”  

Utah Hispanic Legislators also decried the Trump administration’s recent announced policy to break up immigrant families apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Senator Luz Escamilla, District 1, said, “This appointment of Mortensen, along with their latest policy change to break up immigrant families shows how utterly inhumane this administration is. The recent stories of U.S. immigration agents now separating toddlers from their mothers and fathers, with no procedures for reunifying them – is simplify horrifying.  How would any of us feel to have our children separated from us? How is this America? What are we becoming? Such cruel practices should never be committed against human beings who simply want a better life.”

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Utah House Democrats Open Multiple Bill Files Addressing Gun Violence

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: 
May 8, 2018

Contact:         
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
o: (801) 326-1568 | c: (385) 228-5483
rosschambless@le.utah.gov

Utah House Democrats Open Multiple Bill Files Addressing Gun Violence 

SALT LAKE CITY – House Democrats are serious about protecting Utahns from gun violence. 

Today, on the first day that bill files can be opened for the 2019 General Session, House Democrats have begun taking actions to address growing concerns about gun violence.

House Minority Leader Representative Brian King, House District 28, opened a bill file today to require background checks for all firearm sales in the state.  The bill seeks to close “loopholes” such as transactions at gun shows and private online purchases where unlicensed dealers can sell a gun to people without a background check.     

“This is common sense legislation,” said Representative King. “Polling regularly shows that 90 percent of Utahns support requiring background checks for all gun sales, and this support is consistent across the country as well.” 

Representative Joel Briscoe, House District 25, opened a bill file today to prohibit openly carrying firearms around K-12 schools.

“There are regular reports in the Utah media about school lockdowns ordered because someone informs law enforcement that they have seen someone openly carrying a weapon,” said Representative Briscoe. “Our children’s education shouldn’t have to routinely be disrupted because someone wants to brandish a weapon outside a school.” 

Representative Patrice Arent, House District 36, opened three bill files dealing with firearms.  One bill would ban the sale of bump stocks, which are devices that make semi-automatic rifles shoot like rapid fire machine guns. The bill would ban the devices in Utah unless the Federal government outlaws them first. 

Another bill file opened by Representative Arent is a resolution urging Congress to repeal the 1996 Federal “Dickey Amendment” that has prevented the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from researching the effects of gun violence on public health.

A third issue that Representative Arent is reviewing is possible legislation to allow Utahns options for safe disposal of firearms. “I am trying to find a solution for people, like one of my constituents, who wanted to dispose of his gun and did not know what to do with it,” said Representative Arent. “He did not want to sell it to anyone else. Currently, we do not have an answer to this question, so we are looking into the issue.”

Representative Elizabeth Weight, House District 31, opened a bill file to require that all firearms be stored in a safe or with a locking device in place when the firearms are not in use. “Most responsible gun owners already keep their guns safely secured when not using them,” said Representative Weight. “Having some reasonable safety measures isn’t too much to ask.  We want to encourage a safe and thoughtful culture around guns and gun ownership.”

Representative Weight added, “Democrats are interested in preserving Second Amendment rights, but we also see some urgent and critical areas in our laws where we need to improve safety when it comes to firearms.”

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Utah Tribal Leaders, House Democrats Present Proposals ​​​​​​​to Elevate Tribal Voices in State Government

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: March 6, 2018

Contact:        
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

Alastair Lee Bitsoi, Communications Coordinator
Utah Diné Bikéyah
(917) 202-8308 | alastair@utahdinebikeyah.org

Braidan Weeks, Communications Coordinator         
Utah Diné Bikéyah
(801) 372-6438 | braidan@utahdinebikeyah.org

Utah Tribal Leaders, House Democrats Present Proposals
to Elevate Tribal Voices in State Government

SALT LAKE CITY – Today Utah Tribal leaders and Utah House Democrats presented two proposals that would elevate Native American voices in state government.   

Members of the House Democratic Caucus along with Utah Diné Bikéyah, Utah Tribal Leaders Association and Utah League of Native American Voters plan to begin studying two proposals, including: 1) elevating the Division of Indian Affairs to a Cabinet level position, and 2) creating a Joint Standing Committee on Indian Affairs.

“The events of this past year highlighted the need to raise the profile of Native American tribes in Utah,” said Rep. Sue Duckworth, D-Magna. “For far too long, there has been systemic discrimination and oppression of Tribal interests in our state. We need to find ways to include the important voices of Native Americans at the policymaking level, and this is a start.”  
 
“Native Americans must have a say in not just how the state administers policies in and around their reservations, but with anything having to do with their lands,” said Rep. Mark Wheatley, D-Salt Lake City.  “Up until now they’ve been shut out of the process. They should have a voice over how their land is administered and maintained with regard to resource management. Regardless of whether we’re talking about national monuments, resource extraction, or tourism, they must have a seat at the table.”  

“We’re not going to heal by naming a highway after the president, or by breaking up a national monument,” said Rep. Joel Briscoe, D-Salt Lake City. “We’re talking about creating a new dialogue. A respectful dialogue with native peoples who left their marks on the canyon walls thousands of years ago.  I support these efforts to elevate the voices of the native peoples in Utah.”

“I think it’s time for the state of Utah to move forward to recognize the eight native tribes in the state, and bring them to the same level as other cabinet positions,” said Virgil Johnson, Chairman of the Utah Tribal Leaders Association. “This would open up many doors that are now basically closed.”

“Being kept away from the decision-making processes is a policy more befitting of the 19th century than the 21st,” said James Singer, co-founder of the League of Native American Voters. “States and the federal government aren't the only actors in federalism. Under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution, Native nations are Sovereign political entities. Since our peoples are systematically gerrymandered out of the political process, our political voices are disenfranchised. Ignoring our voices isn't only undemocratic, but a vestige of colonial racism that shouldn't be a party of our society. This is a question of equality and political rights. It is a painfully simple thing to do to have a cabinet-level position and create a joint standing committee. It's the right thing to do. And right now is the time to do it. It is something Native voters, we Native people, want to see happen.”

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House Democrats Support Medicinal Marijuana Initiative over Republican Alternative

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: February 13, 2018

Contact:     
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist                  
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

House Democrats Support Medicinal Marijuana Initiative over Republican Alternative

Salt Lake City - Today the House of Representatives voted 38 to 32 to pass H.B. 197, “Cannabis Cultivation Amendments.” The bill would allow the state Department of Agriculture and Food to cultivate and process cannabis in the state for academic or medical research purposes beginning in 2019.  The bill is a companion bill of H.B. 195 “Medical Cannabis Policy,” that passed last week, which would allow a few terminally-ill patients the “right-to-try” medical cannabis under recommendation from their physician.  Most House Democrats voted against the H.B. 197, and instead support the pending statewide medical marijuana ballot initiative over these Republican alternative measures.  

Rep. Brian King said, “Don’t be fooled, this is an attack on the ballot initiative that has support from over 76% of Utahns. These bills have weak regulatory oversight, restrictive provisions on physician and patient options, and complete government takeover of the market. The legislature is insistent on playing the role of the nanny-state and telling Utahns what is ‘best’ for them, rather than listening to the will of the people.”

Rep. Angela Romero stated, “The legalization of medicinal marijuana is inevitable. However, we need to be sure that the regulatory framework we create is controlled, beneficial for patients, and conducive to a fair and competitive market. This bill does the opposite by creating a state monopoly on medicinal cannabis and restricting access to all terminally-ill patients.”

The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration.

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House Lawmakers Vote Down 911 Bill

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release: February 12, 2018

Contact:       

Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

House Lawmakers Vote Down 911 Bill

Salt Lake City – Today the Utah House voted 20 to 51 against passing 1st Sub. H. B. 125 – “Duty to Assist in an Emergency” that would require people to call 911 in the event of a crime or another emergency.  It would only compel people who are able to call 911 or provide assistance to act. Failure to call 911 could result in a class B misdemeanor.

Rep. Merrill Nelson said, "I think our laws presume we are a good, moral people. Our criminal law should not reach so far as to impose criminal penalties for not being a good person. We do it inherently. Our laws should not stretch to not being a good person when not calling when needed.”  

Rep. Lowry Snow said, "My concern is this opens up the discussion now to also imposition of civil liability.  My preference would be this is given more discussion and more vetting. This would be the first time we now impose upon our citizenry an obligation with criminal prosecution if they fail to act. It’s a significant shift in jurisprudence in our state.”  

The bill’s sponsor Rep. Brian King responded, “This bill is extraordinarily topical. Everyday we’re hearing that after years and even decades, people are being revealed as abusers. We need to ferret these individuals out sooner, not later.  The sexual abuse case of Larry Nassar in Michigan showed that someone had to have known for decades this was going on, and that they could have stepped up earlier to stop it, but they didn’t.”

Rep. King added, “Is this a radical departure from traditional laws? It is true our law doesn’t currently obligate us to do this. But for 30 years we’ve required people to report if they witness children or the elderly being abused. When someone is in an accident or a victim of a crime, they are no less vulnerable than a child or elder being abused. This is a modest extension of the law.”

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Democrats Oppose Bill to Create Oversight Committee

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: February 12, 2018

Contact:     Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
                   Utah House Democratic Caucus
                    (801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

Democrats Oppose Bill to Create Oversight Committee

Salt Lake City - Today the House Government Operations Committee voted 6 to 3 in favor of passing H.B. 175 - “Oversight Committee Creation.”  Both Democrats on the committee, Rep. Patrice Arent and Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck voted against the bill. The bill would establish an investigative committee to uncover fraud, abuse, and misconduct, among other things, in all aspects of state and local government that do not directly deal with the courts or the legislature.  The bill was brought back to the committee for consideration after failing once.

Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck, voting against the measure, said, “While we agree that funds need to be used properly in all aspects of government, the vague nature of this bill creates more problems than it is trying to solve. We do not know what the standards of this committee would be in deciding what is considered fraud, abuse, etc. We should be targeting known issues rather than casting an investigative net over the state in the hopes of finding a problem.”

The bill now goes to the House for consideration. 

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Democrats Support Bill to Help Low-Income Families with Family Planning through Medicaid Expansion

Media Statement

 For Immediate Release: January 30, 2018

Contact:     
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

Democrats Support Bill to Help Low-Income Families with Family Planning through Medicaid Expansion

Salt Lake City - Today the House passed HB12, Family Planning Services Amendments, sponsored by Rep. Ray Ward. This bill would create a program to allow the use of Medicaid funds for family planning services for low-income Utah women. The legislation would allow the state to significantly reduce the costs of expensive and long-acting birth control devices, such as IUDs (intrauterine devices), for low-income women and families.  

“We support this bill because it could help as many as 11,000 low-income families in Utah to have more control over when they choose to have children,” says Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck. “Birth control is so expensive, and many low-income Utah women simply cannot afford it.”

Rep. Sandra Hollins stated, “This legislation would save Utah taxpayers a lot of money in the long-term by preventing unwanted pregnancies and abortions. If we can help low-income families avoid unwanted pregnancies through educational programs and other resources, we are reducing the financial toll placed on them. We can also reduce the stress on our state’s social services which we all pay for.” 

Rep. Brian King said, “There is no excuse anymore for us to not do everything we can to assist our most vulnerable families with managing the serious responsibilities that come with parenthood. Taking this action would allow many struggling families to finish school, or keep working until they are ready to start or expand a family.  This is common sense, and something all of us should support.”  

Other states that have passed similar legislation have shown they can save a significant amount of money.  Utah remains one of seven states that have not expanded Medicaid to cover family planning services.

HB12 now moves to the Senate for consideration.

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House Democrats Support Freedom of Choice by Voting Against HB205

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: January 25, 2018

Contact:    
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

House Democrats Support Freedom of Choice by Voting Against HB205

Salt Lake City
– This afternoon House Democrats voted against passing HB205 from the House Judiciary Standing Committee. The bill, Down Syndrome Nondiscrimination Abortion Act, would restrict medical doctors in Utah from performing abortions when a woman seeks the procedure due to a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome.

House Minority Leader Brian King stated, “I am disheartened by the degree to which so many of our legislative colleagues seem to believe that government should be free to intrude on the most personal and private medical decisions women can make. It is inappropriate for the government to impose on women the moral and ideological values of a group of legislators who think they know better than the people directly involved. This bill is inconsistent with a legislative agenda that values personal choice and freedom for individuals in the state.” 

Representative Mark Wheatley said, “Our friends and family with Down syndrome are indeed inspiring and integral to our community. We also do not wish to enable a culture of discrimination.  Of course, we want nothing but the best for our children with Down syndrome.  However, this bill fails to adequately address these concerns of discrimination. We should never force anyone to become a parent against their will. These decisions should be made through conversations between patients and medical professionals. I believe that it is not up to state legislators to make those decisions.”

HB205 is especially problematic as research has shown that unintended pregnancy, unintended births, abortion, and teen pregnancies all occur more frequently among low socioeconomic status and minority women. As legislators, we should be focused on funding essential programs that provide family planning services to these women. These services help to prevent unintended pregnancy in the first place and have been shown to reduce abortion rates.

Legislative general council has indicated that HB205 is extremely legally problematic and very likely unconstitutional. A similar version of this bill in Indiana was overturned by a Federal judge, and other states that have passed similar bills are, or will face legal challenges. Creating such legislation would be fiscally irresponsible as the state would likely face waves of lawsuits in opposition. 

House Democrats are committed to fighting this unconstitutional bill and similar legislation.

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Democrats Urge Utah's Congressional Delegation to Take Action to Protect Americans in the DACA Program

December 22 , 2017

UTAH LEGISLATORS ISSUE OPEN LETTER TO UTAH’S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION ON PRESIDENT TRUMP’S DECISION TO END DACA

SALT LAKE CITY – Today, Utah Democratic Legislators released the following open letter to Utah’s Congressional Delegation calling for immediate action to protect Americans in the DACA program:

An Open Letter to Utah’s Congressional Delegation

Senator Orrin Hatch
Senator Mike Lee
Representa tive Rob Bishop
Representative Mia Love
Representative Chris Stewart
Representative John Curtis

This weekend, you and millions of other families will gather to celebrate the Christmas holiday. This is a time for families to reflect on life’s joys and opportunities and to enjoy the comfort of those whom we love and cherish the most.

Unfortunately, the families of hundreds of thousands of Americans who are enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) will spend this Christmas living in fear as time runs out for this program. Nearly four months ago, President Trump took the irresponsible and cruel action to end the DACA program. In doing so, he left the lives of these young people in the hands of you and your fellow members of Congress. Unfortunately, with a little over two months remaining before recipients begin losing their protected status , Congress has taken no action to address this coming catastrophe.

Once again, we call upon you, as elected federal representatives of this state, to take immediate action to protect DACA enrollees. These young men and women -- known as Dreamers -- were brought to this country as children. Many of them know no other home but this country. They grew up here, they’ve gone to school here, many have served our nation in the military, and they deserve a chance to build lives in this great nation; to do what so many immigrants have done throughout our history: to make America even greater.

On September 1 of this year, Senator Hatch, the senior member of your delegation said that “ We… need a workable, permanent solution for individuals who entered our country unlawfully as children through no fault of their own and who have built their lives here.” On December 20, of this year, he called President Trump “one heck of a leader,” and said that “… we are going to make this the greatest presidency we have seen, not only in generations but maybe ever.” The President responded in kind by calling you a “special friend of mine.” Given the remarkably warm and devoted relationship you have built with the President, we implore you, Senator Hatch, to take this opportunity to use that influence to protect those individuals you spoke so highly of just a few months ago.

Ending DACA will send back in to the shadows close to one million exemplary individuals who trusted the government, played by the rules, pay their taxes and contribute to our society. The President’s cruel and irresponsible actions have ensured that this will be a frightening and insecure Christmas in the homes of Dreamers who are Americans in every way but a piece of paper.

Yet again, we add our voices to those of business leaders and elected officials from across the nation and across party lines to call upon you to show the leadership to pass either the bipartisan DREAM Act, the BRIDGE Act, or similar legislation that provides these young people raised in this country the permanent protection and stability that they deserve. We strongly implore you to sign on as co - sponsors and assure that this legislation passes with all due haste.

Respectfully ,

Senator Gene Davis
Senate Minority Leader

Senator Jim Dabakis

Senator Luz Escamilla

Senator Jani Iwamoto

Senator Karen Mayne

Representative Brian S. King
House Minority Leader

Representative Patrice M. Arent

Representative Joel K. Briscoe

Representative Rebecca Chavez-Houck

Representative Karen Kwan

Representative Lynn Hemmingway

Representative Sandra Hollins

Representative Carol Spackman Moss

Representative Marie H. Poulson

Representative Angela Romero

Representative Elizabeth Weight

Representative Mark A . Wheatley

House Democratic Caucus Leaders Respond to Gov. Herbert’s 2018 Budget Proposal

Media Statement

For Immediate Release: December 13, 2017

Contact:   
Ross Chambless, Communications Specialist
Utah House Democratic Caucus
(801) 326-1568 | rosschambless@le.utah.gov

House Democratic Caucus Leaders Respond to Gov. Herbert’s 2018 Budget Proposal

Salt Lake City – Today with the release of Gov. Herbert’s proposed 2018 budget, Utah House Democrats find several aspects of the budget they can support. 

Specifically, giving more than 70 percent of the $382 million of new on-going money towards education for our children is certainly what Utahns want.  Using these additional funds to give local schools more flexibility to invest in teachers and for supporting at-risk children are also good ideas that Democrats can support.  Utahns urgently want more funding for K-12 public school education with appropriate accountability, and the Governor’s budget is a good start.

House Democrats also support the Governor’s goal to improve air quality by aiming to reduce harmful emissions by 25 percent by 2026. The governor’s plan for increased funding for air quality research, and more flexibility in using Transportation Investment Funds (TIF) for all modes of transportation – not just for highways – will make improvements to our air quality.  

It is also important that we continue to fund Operation Rio Grande, and that we responsibly support populations without homes through mental health and substance abuse treatment. House Democrats also support working to create more jobs for rural Utahns, giving more funds to rural Utah schools, and improving and possibly expanding our state park system.   We also look forward to learning more about the governor’s specific ideas on reforming Utah’s tax code.  

“This is a good place to start for a budget bid,” said Rep. Joel Briscoe. “We think he’s got some good policy ideas here.  Helping at-risk kids, increased education funding, and a continued focus on improving air quality are all things Utahns want to see happen.”

“We look forward to working with the governor and other representatives who also want to move our state forward with policies that keep our state economically strong, while helping working families and our children,” said House Democratic Minority Leader Brian King.

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